Prodigal Frogmouth?

June 4, 2019

From my kitchen window, I spotted an unusual blob in one of the casuarinas in the yard.  We’d had a windy night, so it could be a broken-off branch. In fact it was both. The Tawny Frogmouth had wedged itself behind a broken limb, and was there for two days. Then it appeared in the […]

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Colour chemistry

May 28, 2019

Here on the coast, we lack the crispness to create stunning avenues of Autumn colour as in the Southern Highlands or Canberra. But my Glory Vine, or Ornamental Grape, does its best. It has been moving with me via cuttings from the Mountain original. It colours differently here, but then our Autumns are not the […]

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Colouring a shed

May 20, 2019

I inherited a perfectly neat and serviceable but boringly plain shed when I moved here. It happened to be green, with a reddish trim. I fancied a Virginia Creeper might suit, but doubted it would creep up smooth tin like this. The nursery couldn’t guarantee it would. I took the chance. But very slowly, those […]

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Golden acrobats

May 13, 2019

The greyheaded flying fox colony in Wingham Brush is enormous: about 200,000 at peak times. As the sun hits their trees in the morning, the chatter and activity sounds like every bit of a peak time. I am fascinated by these creatures, watching their deft acrobatics as they stretch a wing or hang by one […]

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Sleepy Brush morning

May 7, 2019

In the reclaimed Brush at Wingham, Brush Turkeys abound. In daytimes, they are usually seen scratching amongst the leaf litter. Today I entered the Brush on the still-dark side. It was too early for their routine, and I caught them napping. This was the first time I had seen them roosting on branches. Neither of […]

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Climate Change: The Facts

April 30, 2019

I urge you to watch this film with your family, to recommend it, to share it and/or show it to groups. Al Gore’s film woke many of us up. David Attenborough sums it up and shakes us hard, in this excellent and comprehensive documentary. It covers the varied causes, the current status, the possible tipping […]

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Mist dwellers

April 29, 2019

Arranged like a tableau on stage, these fungi glowed at me from the gloom of the Rainforest Walk in the Australian Native Botanical Gardens in Canberra. Unsurprisingly, the climate of Canberra is not great for rainforest plants, so frequent misting is needed to keep plants happy. Waiting until a break in misting episodes seemed sensible, […]

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Sharing a small cove

April 22, 2019

On the mid north coast of New South Wales, there are many secret small coves like this one, usually in national parks and accessed by foot. You may see another person or two there, but seldom more. But other creatures actually live there! Like this perfectly camouflaged tiny crab, who kept disappearing and then popping […]

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High rise neighbours

April 12, 2019

I am bordered on two sides by tall trees – casuarinas, camphor laurels and cadaghi (Corymbia torelliana), with lower growing myrtles and pittosporum and melaleucas. I hear heaps of birds that I rarely see. One I have often heard – or thought I had – is the Powerful Owl (Ninox strenua). Its mournful, slow ‘woo-hoo’ […]

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Fig dilemma

April 1, 2019

I love the large Jacaranda tree outside my house, even if it is an introduced tree that self-seeds rather too readily. But over the last year I have watched a Strangler Fig that some passing bird has seeded in the Jacaranda fork steadily grow larger. But eventually it will ‘strangle’ the host, as I see […]

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Flush with fungi

March 25, 2019

With rain every few days and humidity almost liquid — or it is on my person! — fungi are thriving. Nothing spectacular or colourful, some rather shy and delicate, but each different in an unassuming way. And the large colony amongst my raised garden beds is still renewing itself, growing larger and more fleshy each […]

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Nannas sash-on for Water

March 11, 2019

What better way to mark International Womens Day 2019 than for 120 KNAGs (Knitting Nannas against Gas/Greed) from all over NSW to converge on Sydney to get their message out, ‘United to Protect our Water’. In a yellow and black tide, red-rimmed for solidarity with their indigenous sisters, they met in Martin Place. I’m an […]

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